RISE Programs at #AFAAM 2016
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Posted by  in Professional Development

Find our team members in the following programs at the #AFAAM Annual Meeting!

Preparing for the future: The evolving fraternity/sorority professional

Add to Calendar12/01/2016 10:1512/01/2016 11:30America/DetroitPreparing for the future: The evolving fraternity/sorority professionalDan Wrona, Justin Kirk, Jeremiah Shinn, Block 1, #114, December 1, 10:15 am – 11:30 am
The role of campus-based fraternity/sorority professionals has evolved over the past 40 years, and the markers of success are still changing. With increasing calls for accountability and shrinking resources in higher education, fraternity/sorority professionals will need to reposition themselves to remain relevant. Using recent research on the profession, this two-part session will ask participants to rethink the role of the campus-based fraternity/sorority professional, provide a framework for improving their impact, and guide them in integrating it into their work. We will examine the contribution of fraternity/sorority professionals to student outcomes, relationships with institutional partners, and how to better prioritize time and resources. This developmental experience will prepare participants to make sense of their responsibilities and develop strategies for improving their work.
Participants will discover guiding ideas for professional practice, including serving institutional objectives, collaborating with other departments, simultaneously addressing micro and macro-level work, and continuous development and engagement.
Participants will identify strategies and techniques for aligning and prioritizing time, energy, and resources according to the guiding ideas of the profession.
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Dan Wrona, Justin Kirk, Jeremiah Shinn

Block 1, #114, December 1, 10:15 am – 11:30 am, Stone

The role of campus-based fraternity/sorority professionals has evolved over the past 40 years, and the markers of success are still changing. With increasing calls for accountability and shrinking resources in higher education, fraternity/sorority professionals will need to reposition themselves to remain relevant. Using recent research on the profession, this two-part session will ask participants to rethink the role of the campus-based fraternity/sorority professional, provide a framework for improving their impact, and guide them in integrating it into their work. We will examine the contribution of fraternity/sorority professionals to student outcomes, relationships with institutional partners, and how to better prioritize time and resources. This developmental experience will prepare participants to make sense of their responsibilities and develop strategies for improving their work.
Participants will discover guiding ideas for professional practice, including serving institutional objectives, collaborating with other departments, simultaneously addressing micro and macro-level work, and continuous development and engagement.
Participants will identify strategies and techniques for aligning and prioritizing time, energy, and resources according to the guiding ideas of the profession.


Working well with others: Preparing yourself to manage out and up

Add to Calendar12/01/2016 13:3012/01/2016 14:45America/DetroitWorking well with others: Preparing yourself to manage out and upDan Wrona, Becky Druetzler, Block 2, #208, Thursday, December 1, 1:30 pm – 2:45 pm
Change in higher education is constant, whether it’s a new initiative, strategic plan, boss, president, or realignment. More than ever, it is important for fraternity/sorority professionals to work effectively across departments and up the organization chart. You may be familiar with all the topics and issues, but are you prepared to navigate the interpersonal relationships involved in this type of work? This session will focus on developing strategies to work effectively with peers and administrators throughout the organization. Learn how to be a good partner, supervisee, and manager and how to develop the expertise you will need to contribute. If you’re ready for some introspection and personal growth, join us for a coaching session on how you can cultivate better interpersonal relationships.
Participants will gain understanding of expectations, priorities, and staff roles within an organization from the perspective of peers and administrators, and they will identify strategies for being more effective in how they work with others.
Participants will identify areas where fraternity/sorority life professionals can become experts within their institutions and identify strategies for cultivating expertise.
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Dan Wrona, Becky Druetzler

Block 2, #208, Thursday, December 1, 1:30 pm – 2:45 pm, Faneuil

Change in higher education is constant, whether it’s a new initiative, strategic plan, boss, president, or realignment. More than ever, it is important for fraternity/sorority professionals to work effectively across departments and up the organization chart. You may be familiar with all the topics and issues, but are you prepared to navigate the interpersonal relationships involved in this type of work? This session will focus on developing strategies to work effectively with peers and administrators throughout the organization. Learn how to be a good partner, supervisee, and manager and how to develop the expertise you will need to contribute. If you’re ready for some introspection and personal growth, join us for a coaching session on how you can cultivate better interpersonal relationships.
Participants will gain understanding of expectations, priorities, and staff roles within an organization from the perspective of peers and administrators, and they will identify strategies for being more effective in how they work with others.
Participants will identify areas where fraternity/sorority life professionals can become experts within their institutions and identify strategies for cultivating expertise.


Where have all the leaders gone? Helping students self-govern and increase their accountability

Add to Calendar12/02/2016 10:3012/02/2016 11:45America/DetroitWhere have all the leaders gone? Helping students self-govern and increase their accountabilityDan Wrona, Mike McRee, Block 5, #509, Friday, December 2, 10:30 am – 11:45 am
For many students, their muscle of self-governance is fully atrophied. This interactive session will focus on the why and how we find ourselves where students are seemingly unable to step up, hold each other accountable, and lead successfully. We will peel the onion back to reveal what cultural factors are at play, philosophical underpinnings and schemas used. This session will provide immediate strategies that campus and headquarters professionals can use to improve their work with students to allow them to self-govern and hold each other accountable. Implications for how we do our work, successful and unsuccessful theoretical constructs will be explored, and training and development opportunities will be discussed.
Participants will be able to list core elements of a self-governance philosophy, describe how it is integral to the identity of fraternal organizations, and explain how it supports a healthy community.
Participants will be able to identify situations where self-governance tends to be abandoned, often unintentionally, and they will be able to list behaviors and strategies for supporting self-governance.
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Dan Wrona, Mike McRee

Block 5, #509, Friday, December 2, 10:30 am – 11:45 am, Paine

For many students, their muscle of self-governance is fully atrophied. This interactive session will focus on the why and how we find ourselves where students are seemingly unable to step up, hold each other accountable, and lead successfully. We will peel the onion back to reveal what cultural factors are at play, philosophical underpinnings and schemas used. This session will provide immediate strategies that campus and headquarters professionals can use to improve their work with students to allow them to self-govern and hold each other accountable. Implications for how we do our work, successful and unsuccessful theoretical constructs will be explored, and training and development opportunities will be discussed.
Participants will be able to list core elements of a self-governance philosophy, describe how it is integral to the identity of fraternal organizations, and explain how it supports a healthy community.
Participants will be able to identify situations where self-governance tends to be abandoned, often unintentionally, and they will be able to list behaviors and strategies for supporting self-governance.


Toxic belongingness: When the want to be a part becomes problematic

Add to Calendar12/02/2016 10:3012/02/2016 11:45America/DetroitToxic belongingness: When the want to be a part becomes problematicBrittany Barnes, Erin McHale, Block 5, #517, Friday, December 2, 10:30 am – 11:45 am
Fraternal organizations pride themselves on creating a sense of belonging among members. What happens when the sense of belonging comes at moral and ethical costs to the members? At what point does the fear of isolation to address the concerns outweigh the need to belong, and how are professionals helping students navigate that internal struggle? This program examines literature on toxic organizations and feelings of belonging, steps to aid students to identify it from within, and ways to support students through addressing these environments.
Participants will outline the ways sense of belonging contributes to organizational toxicity.
Participants will detail steps to support students as they navigate complex social systems when addressing toxic groups.
RevereMM/DD/YYYYaySwuBUGCzgcENXGCmnY23668

Brittany Barnes, Erin McHale

Block 5, #517, Friday, December 2, 10:30 am – 11:45 am, Revere

Fraternal organizations pride themselves on creating a sense of belonging among members. What happens when the sense of belonging comes at moral and ethical costs to the members? At what point does the fear of isolation to address the concerns outweigh the need to belong, and how are professionals helping students navigate that internal struggle? This program examines literature on toxic organizations and feelings of belonging, steps to aid students to identify it from within, and ways to support students through addressing these environments.
Participants will outline the ways sense of belonging contributes to organizational toxicity.
Participants will detail steps to support students as they navigate complex social systems when addressing toxic groups.


Using assessment to develop planning, infrastructure, and approaches to our work

Add to Calendar12/02/2016 14:3012/02/2016 15:45America/DetroitUsing assessment to develop planning, infrastructure, and approaches to our workDan Bureau, Dan Faill, Jason Bergeron, Kevin Bazner, Block 6, #614, Friday, December 2, 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm
Assessment has become increasingly valued within higher education, student affairs and the interfraternal community. Through assessment we learn about the experiences of students and stakeholders. However, what comes after is often not predetermined or unclear by those who have engaged in assessment processes: we must do more than collect data and let it sit on the shelf. Through this session, participants will engage in a discussion about how assessment data was used to inform planning processes, office/departmental infrastructure changes, and overall approaches to advising.
Participants will identify strategies to use assessment data for the improvement of their programs.
Participants will explain how assessment can be used as a framework for ongoing practice in fraternity and sorority life.
FaneuilMM/DD/YYYYaySwuBUGCzgcENXGCmnY23668

Dan Bureau, Dan Faill, Jason Bergeron, Kevin Bazner

Block 6, #614, Friday, December 2, 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm, Faneuil

Assessment has become increasingly valued within higher education, student affairs and the interfraternal community. Through assessment we learn about the experiences of students and stakeholders. However, what comes after is often not predetermined or unclear by those who have engaged in assessment processes: we must do more than collect data and let it sit on the shelf. Through this session, participants will engage in a discussion about how assessment data was used to inform planning processes, office/departmental infrastructure changes, and overall approaches to advising.
Participants will identify strategies to use assessment data for the improvement of their programs.
Participants will explain how assessment can be used as a framework for ongoing practice in fraternity and sorority life.


How to: Use curriculum mapping to enhance student learning

Add to Calendar12/03/2016 14:0012/03/2016 15:00America/DetroitHow to: Use curriculum mapping to enhance student learningDan Wrona, Kathleen Tucker, Block 8, #801, Saturday, December 3, 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Curriculum mapping is an instructional design technique used as part of a needs assessment to evaluate existing educational efforts. Institutions and organizations use it to identify gaps, overlaps, and other problems with the programs they provide and to develop strategies for aligning programs with intended outcomes and their larger educational strategy. Join us for a step-by-step introduction to the curriculum mapping process. Because this is structured as a how-to session, we will share real life examples of how it is being used to enhance student learning and provide you with a framework for putting it into practice it in your own community or organization.
Describe the features of curriculum maps and the basic steps to develop them
Use a curriculum map to identify learning needs and develop strategies for improving outcomes and experiences.
Harbor 3MM/DD/YYYYaySwuBUGCzgcENXGCmnY23668

Dan Wrona, Kathleen Tucker

Block 8, #801, Saturday, December 3, 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm, Harbor 3

Curriculum mapping is an instructional design technique used as part of a needs assessment to evaluate existing educational efforts. Institutions and organizations use it to identify gaps, overlaps, and other problems with the programs they provide and to develop strategies for aligning programs with intended outcomes and their larger educational strategy. Join us for a step-by-step introduction to the curriculum mapping process. Because this is structured as a how-to session, we will share real life examples of how it is being used to enhance student learning and provide you with a framework for putting it into practice it in your own community or organization.
Describe the features of curriculum maps and the basic steps to develop them
Use a curriculum map to identify learning needs and develop strategies for improving outcomes and experiences.

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